Materials

Daizen did it again! Cladding Glulam with WRC – grain matched with end grain!

  |   Design, Details, Joinery, Materials, Techniques

So we did it again! Another job where the team of highly skilled hand crafters have shown their expertise. What do you do when you’ll need large size clear WRC but can’t source enough material? The answer is simple: Get some treated glulam and add WRC as a veneer around it. It even works well with the end grain!

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Curve from two timber laminated

  |   Design, Details, Materials, Techniques

Curve shape cut out from solid timber always challenge since it require large section of timber. It is not only hard to locate the fiber, timber will have significant check on surface since it contains so much difference in fiber tension depends on part of section in timber.

This can be solved by having two smaller timber laminated, much easier to find good fiber and also grain match. Seems like this approach can be develop further more by specifying timber grain in detail and how we re-saw to match grain!

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What it takes to dry WRC timber?

  |   Announcement, Materials, Press release, Techniques
Drying WRC in larger section than 4″ has been extremely challenge and we have
not found any services we could utilize to dry this wood. So we have decided
to purchase own and it took time to research and set to technology works
for us.
Drying wood can be done in a few different way but when it comes to leaving
wood essence in a wood, keeping maximum strength of wood fiber, it has to do
with temperature it uses, lower is better, we think it has to be below 70 degree Celsius
at the highest and we run under 60 degree Celsius.
Loading WRC, 13,000 bdft in one charge.

Loading WRC, 13,000 bdft in one charge.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Kiln contgrol pic

On time monitoring the M/C in a kiln, total of 10 sensor is in actual wood and sensor runs system. Each drying process is driven by result base, once wood hit to programmed M/C, it kicks into next process. This is very unique that most system runs by time. monitoring the M/C in a kiln, total of 10 sensor is in actual wood and sensor runs system.  Each drying process is driven by result base, once wood hit to programmed M/C, it kicks into next process. This is very unique that most system runs by time.

 

 

 

 

Green shows M/C coming down from 90%, red indicate temperature not going over 60 degree Celsius and blue is pressure in a chamber dropped to 10% of natural environment. Water will boil at 50 degree Celsius in this chamber.

This piece shows 12% at the core, WRC even shows different result along the length, and we are still R&D to overcome this to be dry more evenly.

This piece shows 12% at the core, WRC even shows different result along the length, and we are still R&D to overcome this to be dry more evenly.

This shows some timber still have wet spot, even wet spot exist along the timber some area are dry and some are wet, we will nail down the cause through the research!

This shows some timber still have wet spot, even wet spot exist along the timber some area are
dry and some are wet, we will nail down the cause through the research!

 Best method I can think of is to shave with hand planer, wood fiber that has damaged by heat will not create thin shaving, and our wood does.


Best method I can think of is to shave with hand planer, wood fiber that has damaged by heat
will not create thin shaving, and our wood does.

Shaving with fiber continuous for healthy drying.

Shaving with fiber continuous for healthy drying.

 Ends are nice and shine after sanding, because it is dry also kept the natural oil that wood has!

Ends are nice and shine after sanding, because it is dry also kept the natural oil that wood has!

Waterlox stain is applied on picture above.

Waterlox stain is applied on picture above.

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Cedar finish par excellence

  |   Details, Materials, Techniques, Uncategorized

Take a look at some excellent cedar products we are creating with finest craftsmanship at Daizen Joinery.

Core dried Western Red Cedar rafter tails, combined with a superb oil finish creates this shiny, long lasting look in furniture quality. So prod of my guys in the shop!

20160520_192510657_iOS20160521_001335000_iOSWRC rafter tails

and before finish:

WRC before finishWRC before finish

How do we archive this quality? Well, it all starts with a clean shop and careful material handling……

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Wood Moisture Considerations in Timber Framing

  |   Materials

Did you know… when logs are harvested they still contain water from the tree’s roots. When the moisture content drops below 30%, wood products begin to shrink and change shape. This transformation continues until wood moisture is stabilized through environmental influences such as temperature and humidity.

Because of its climate, British Columbia, Canada, has some of the best quality softwood in the world. BC’s cold climate makes trees grow tight and straight.

If wood-working processes are applied to timber products before the wood has stabilized, the shape of the joinery will change as the wood shrinks and adjusts to the environment.

What moisture content do we aim for? That depends on the destination of the product. Dry climates require drier wood. In wet climates, if very dry wood is used, the dimensions and shape expand after the wood reaches its destination. In the British Columbia Interior, where we are located, optimum timber moisture content averages around 10%.

Additional costs may sometimes be associated with this wood drying process, and we have seen examples where this has influenced peoples’ decisions to use green materials. However, based on our expertise, the results of using green wood are never optimal. In our experience, ensuring the appropriate dryness of timbers based on the climate they are being used in is the only way to build your project.

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Residential Glulam

  |   Materials, Newsletter

From Daizen News, May 2013

Glulam, or glue-laminate, is engineered wood that is twice the strength of #1 grade timber and is sometimes used as a beam.  It is composed of several layers of dimensioned timber bonded together with durable, moisture-resistant structural adhesives.

Glulam is frequently used in large scale projects like airports and manufacturing facilities in order to achieve a large open span. As an industrial component, it looks good, but for a residential application, we use Glulam in a different way.

First, to soften the laminated look, it’s best if the glue in the lamination is clear. Then, we wire-brush the surface in order to blend the glue lines in. Finally, we use a dark stain color.

Glulam can be an affordable alternative to big timbers. At any size bigger than 8 in. x 14 ft., or longer than 24 ft., the cost of kiln dried timber rises to exceed that of engineered wood . . . and then the point is reached where natural timber at that size does not exist. For this project, an industrial feel is part of the design concept, so Glulam is the material of choice.

Another Glulam project: Best Western Revelstoke

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Spotlight on comb finish

  |   Materials, Newsletter, Uncategorized

From Daizen News October 2012

Wood offers lots of options. One of the most important to homeowners—because it concerns the entire timber surface that you see (and live with) in the finished house—is the finish. If you want a rustic feel to your timber but don’t like fuzzy fibers that catch dust and provide an easy path for spiders, a comb finish may be the answer for you. In most cases, vertical grain is the favored grain look, but in a comb finish, flat grain is also pleasing to look at it.

To achieve a comb finish, we scrub a nylon brush along the grain that digs into, and compresses, the softer fibers. This makes the tight-grained winter growth stand out in relief. Running your hand over it feels good—you get to feel the grain, not just see it.

A comb finish also stands out more when stained.

It’s more work for us, which means a bit more cost, but the result is stunning. Most people who see it (and feel it) really love it.

For more, see our article, “Wood Texture,” on our website’s Downloads page.

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Epoxy post anchor system: the best so far

  |   Materials, Newsletter

From Daizen News October 2012

We work on many projects, so we receive lots of connection specs from many engineers. It seems like the post anchor connection is still a grey zone in terms of best practices.

This year, we’ve used epoxy anchor connections for almost all of our frames. Why? I think it’s because epoxy anchors lived up to all we thought they would be in their reasonable cost, ease of use, and reliability.

In most steel plate connections, the plates need to be embedded. Plates designed to be attached after the raising still need to be specially fabricated. We often get a phone call after the contractor has installed the frame: “Can you send me detailed information on the connections?” Strangely, we expect to get this information from the contractor! Clearly, there is clearly no generally-accepted standard connection for post anchors, so we have decided to provide a solution for it.

To see this YouTube video of the epoxy connection being assembled, click the image or this link—epoxy video.

When we see the new-building details for post anchors specified with expensive knife plates, we know it means lots of work to set them in place and prepare the timber slot for the plate, which in turn means much greater cost and lots of communication. If we knew who designed this, we could send them information in advance about what we’ve found works better. The epoxy system we favor is much easier to handle.

I explain it to engineers like this. “The epoxy connection is just like a threaded rod cured with epoxy in concrete and wood, except the engineer doesn’t need to worry about whether epoxy will fill properly, because our preferred system is designed to do that.”

Epoxy is injected into threaded rods.

The cavity fills from the middle.

I instruct the job supervisor as follows: “On the concrete that will support the post, find the spot that will be the center of each post, and drill a 6-in.-deep hole there, making sure no rebar is placed in that area. We will provide the rods. Please make sure to insert them with the injection nose accessible for filling the epoxy in once the frame is built.

“Regular concrete epoxy starts to cure in about 5 minutes, so each post needs to be stabilized in its final position for this time. With our system, you don’t need to hold each post in a definite position for 5 minutes. It allows the entire frame to be raised first. You can adjust the post locations, plumb them, and then inject the epoxy, which will set in place.

“The threaded rod is hollow; the injection nozzle plugs into it halfway down its length. The epoxy will flow out from the end of the rod, so when we see any excess from the injection hole, we know the entire space is filled.”

Setup for injecting the epoxy.  Note the small hole at the bottom of the timber.

The epoxy is injected into the hole. When epoxy oozes out, the cavity is full.

To summarize, here are the advantages of this system.

  • It requires no steel fabrication.

    It does not require any preparation in the concrete, except to make sure the center of the post location is rebar-free.

    The epoxy doesn’t need to be filled while building is happening; you inject the epoxy once all adjustments are complete and you’re ready to secure the post.

There is no distributor in North America for this epoxy system, so we carry the stock. For further details, please email us.

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An Air-Tight Joint

  |   Joinery, Materials, Newsletter

From Daizen News, September 2012

We see two different types of timber frame. One is a frame covered with Structural Insulated Panels (SIP) for high energy efficiency: a highly insulated, air-tight house system.

The other has an infill wall system where the frame is visible both inside and outside. In the infill wall frame, we use full-size tenons so the air cannot penetrate, but we also started using a gasket that is slotted into the joinery and then fills at the frame raising. The HannoWerk seal from Germany is a closed cell seal that expands to block any air or water that might run into the space.

Since we use a seal, the tenon does not need to be full size. We couldn’t achieve this effect with a bead of caulking because timber can shrink and, if a gap occurs, the caulk doesn’t have the ability to expand. Here you can see a groove just to the left of the tenon, where the seal will sit.

The seal in its groove. The groove is necessary so that the seal is seated and is not crushed as it expands.

The groove, with seal, is outside of the joinery. Most likely, the seal will be hidden by a framed infill wall.

Seal arrives to us compressed in a roll that will expand to almost 10 times its original size, to ensure that the gap is sealed.

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